How To Remove A Seized Bolt With No Head – We Have Your Answer!

Working with a seized bolt without the head is frustrating and time-consuming. However, knowing how to remove a seized bolt with no head can be time and money-saving.

It’s not difficult to remove a seized bolt without the head, as long as you have the proper tools and know what to do.

Sometimes you can use a power drill and a hammer to unscrew the bolt, and if all else fails, you can resort to hammering the bolt and retrying it.

Here is the easiest way you can remove rusted screws.

How to remove bolts with no head

Step 1 — Make a Center punch

To begin, locate the screw head and use a center punch to make a hole in the middle of the screw shaft. Doing this may require a little bit of tapping a thin nail into the middle of the screw, depending on the screw.

To add to the issue, if the threading on the bolt hole is damaged. You may not be able to use a new bolt once the old one is extracted.

Take a quarter-inch drill bit and start drilling into the side of the shaft once the quarter-inch drill bit is at an appropriate depth.

Step 2 — Start Drill

Take a more significant drill bit from the first drill bit and start drilling into the side of the shaft. Use an easy-out tool to loosen the bolts once the drill bit gets down to the first drill bit.

Step 3 — Turn Out the Tool

 Then, remove the screw shaft. First, loosen the screws surrounding the shaft by turning the key so the shaft becomes movable.

Step 4 — Inspect the Condition

After loosening the screws, if the shaft is still immovable and does not come out, it is time to remove the easy out.

Step 5 — Remove the Screw

First, use the drill to enlarge the hole until the threads are left. Next, strip away the lines of the screw using a big plastic-headed pin. And finally, pull them out of the threads of the opening.

How to Remove a Seized Bolt with No Head

Since you can use bolts for a wide variety of applications, one can find bolts in many places. To maintain bolts, one must ensure that bolts are not rusty. 

The bolts found in machines or other places tend to be made from metals that can rust. Rust can degrade a bolt over time. 

But if one is patient, examines the situation, and applies a proper strategy, they will have a greater chance of removing the rusted bolt successfully

Step 1 — Examines the Situation

But if one is patient, examines the case, and applies a proper strategy, They will have an increased chance of removing the rusted bolt successfully.

Carefully inspect the steel bolt for signs of rust. If you see rust, it’s time to check the torque so it doesn’t snap.

“Avoid a deadbolt at all costs.” If you think that the bolt is worth saving, it will be better to change it. However, most people can save screws and bolts by using locking pliers on the J-nut.

Step 2 — Removing rust on your metal surface

If you think you can still save the bolt, but an effort to take the rust off the threads as much as possible. By doing so, you can be sure to have it done much quicker.

Rust can quickly accumulate on metal surfaces, but removing rust doesn’t have to be hard! Try these three helpful tips for removing rust on your metal surface:

  • First, make sure to use a scrubber. Do this after removing the threaded bolt.
  • Next, apply some water. Using this instead of abrasive or solvent-based scrubbers, you’ll get the rust off much more manageable.
  • The last thing you should do is get a wire brush. 

Step 3 — Choosing the most appropriate tools

 In the following, I will discuss the process of selecting the most appropriate tools for a job. There are a wide variety of factors to consider when choosing the correct device for a position.

There are a wide variety of factors to consider when choosing the correct device for a position.

A wrench with an open-ended jaw will likely provide a better grip for a bolt. A wrench with a six-pointed jaw will be a more efficient choice for bolts that are not symmetrical.

Step 4 — Directions

Do not confuse right with left or left with right, or you will have a stubborn bolt to unscrew. Use your left hand to turn the bolt clockwise. If you are facing the bolt, your right hand is facing away from the bolt.

Step 5 — Apply a liquid thread loosened

Here are three ingenious ways to loosen a stubborn rusted bolt. Try liquid thread loosened, penetrating oil, or acetone and liquid ATF. You can also mix acetone and liquid ATF for an even stronger liquid solvent.

Step 5 — Soak the bolts

Soak the old, rusty, stubborn bolts with oil for two minutes before you try to unscrew them. Repeat the soakings liberally with the best-quality penetrating oil you can find. 

Suppose the bolt is particularly stubborn, even making an overnight soak. In that case, some patients might give you more time before you have to resort to more drastic measures.

Tossing the nut on the ground will not be helpful. Luckily, the residual Heat present in the nut helps us out, making the process of breaking the bond much more straightforward.

Step 6 — Use Heat

Heat is all it takes to break that rust bond and melt that locking compound. Since oil is flammable, use the flame to clean off all the oil before using it in an area that may cause a fire.

Step 7 — Attaining Batter Leverage

 The best way to loosen a tough bolt is with a breaker bar. The key is to use finesse, applying pressure evenly. If you pull too hard, you might strip the threads, so start with light pressure and increase as needed.

If the resistance becomes unnoticeable, it means either you are stripping the thread, or you’ve destroyed the bolt. To protect your fingers, wear gloves.

Step 8 — Paraffin as a lubricant

Here is how experts go about removing rusted pipe plugs from cast iron:

  • Heat the iron and melt a candle over the threads.
  • Paraffin will cover the threads and act as a lube.
  • Use a snug-fitting and properly sized socket.

Step 9 — Last Resort

In the tight space, where a nut stuck because of fastened it too tightly. It is essential to use a pneumatic or electric impact gun to free it. 

The best option is to make sure you wear protective gloves and glasses when using this high-powered tool and only for the larger nuts.

If you can, try to use the gun to loosen the wedged nut and hold the bolts with a wrench.

Don’t have time? Try these three easy ways to remove a Rusted Bolt.

Rust remover spray

Rust can be difficult to remove without making it worse. Many rust remover products are on the market, designed to target the bond created by rust.

Spray on the bolt head and wait patiently for the product to work its way into the threads. After soaking the screw and bolts for 10 minutes, you can attempt to disengage it.

Use Hammer

Some people believe that a powerful strike of a hammer can remove rusted bolts. However, a powerful strike of a hammer can do much damage to a surface many times. 

Always wear an eye-protective shield before carrying out a powerful hammer strike and carefully hit the top of the bolt using a hammer. When trying to remove the bolt with a screwdriver, be careful not to use a powerful strike of a hammer.

Use duct tape

If you’re looking to be extra sure that your fastener doesn’t come undone, cover the head with a couple of layers of duct tape and insert the screwdriver. Once the screwdriver grips the duct tape, you can turn and remove the fastener.

MAINTENANCE

  • Use reasonable force and avoid over-tightening the bolts.
  • Lubricate your bolts or studs with a high-quality thread lube to prevent seizing by galvanic corrosion.
  • Apply a spray paint coating over the fastener heads to avoid rust.
  • Paint also seals moisture out of the threads, keeping them dry and new.
  • Be meticulous about scrubbing the teeth of the fastener’s head.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS (FAQ)

How fast does vinegar remove rust?

It usually takes about 30 minutes to a few hours for vinegar to properly get rid of rust, depending on how bad the rust is.

Will heating a bolt loosen it?

Yes, you can use heat and fire to break the rust bond and melt the locking compound.

How do you unscrew a rusted bolt without wd40?

To remove a stripped screw, put a splash of vinegar or soda on the screw. Hang it by the tip for a few minutes. Please give it a tap with the hammer now and then. Keep waiting.

How do you loosen a bolt in a tight space?

When you’re in a tight space, always beware. If you fasten the nut too tightly, you’re in for a tough time. Use a pneumatic or electric impact gun to free it.

Conclusion

Leaving bolts and screws unattended can lead to rust and seizing. It is beneficial to know How to Remove a Seized Bolt with No Head before it starts to cause you lots of time and money to call the experts.

The key to being successful in the process is to start with the right tools. Apply the proper tools, tips, and tricks to have a hassle-free experience when removing rusted bolts.

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Hello. You've come to the right place if you want to learn more about power drills and how to make your home improvement projects go quicker and easier. I'm Jacob P., the founder and content writer of drill-guy.com. Anyone who needs assistance with a project or has a query about how something works (or doesn't) can count on me to share my expertise.